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How To Wrap A Cake In Chocolate

 

Here are my step by step instructions for making a chocolate wrap.

Chocolate Wrap Instructions

I use Mylar, a clear plastic that comes in sheets from a plastic store,
you should be able to find it at an art supply as well. Or you can use
acetate dessert collars as long as they are at least 4" wide and long
enough to go around your cake.

There are different thicknesses of Mylar and you have to kind of go
by trial and error. If it is too thick it will want to pull away from your
cake when you wrap, too thin and it will wobble and make a wavy
finished wrap. Hold the plastic sheet by the edges with both hands
and flex it back and forth, you want one that isn't too stiff, just
flexible.

I measure the circumference of the iced cake plus about 1/4" and the
height that I want the wrap to be, usually a bit taller than the iced
cake. My cakes are 4" tall, so I measure the wrap to be 4 1/2" wide.
Have your cake iced and on a covered board before melting your
chocolate.

I use untempered chocolate for wraps but I do add 1 T. vegetable
oil or melted and cooled cocoa butter per each pound of chocolate.
Use a good quality chocolate for best taste and shine. It only takes
about 1 1/2 to 2 cups melted chocolate to do the full strip.

Lay the strip of plastic on a work surface long enough to accomodate
the full strip. Pour the melted chocolate in the middle of the strip from
top to bottom, smooth with an off set spatula. You want it to be about
1/8" thick after smoothing. Too thin and you will be able to see through
the wrap and it will be too fragile, too thick and the finished wrap will
look globby and be too heavy. Don't be concerned if you go outside
the edges of the strip, it will pull away pretty clean when you lift it.

Let the wrap set on the work surface for about 5 minutes. Then pick it
up carefully at the edge of both ends with your fingertips. Get it in as
close as possible to the bottom of your cake, tilt the top of the wrap
towards your body just slightly. Let the bottom of the strip touch the
cake board just next to the cake. Move your hands in, bringing the
strip top up so the plastic is standing straight upright and is touching
the side of the cake. Begin moving both hands in opposite directions
until the strip is completely wrapped around the cake. Touch one end of the strip to the cake. You will have a bit of overlap when you bring the other end around. Just touch it to the end of the other to seal. If there are any bare spots on the wrap from your fingertips, dab a tiny bit of melted chocolate with a knife tip to neaten and cover the empty spot.

Put cake in the fridge until the chocolate is completely set. It takes
about 10 minutes of so. Carefully take a pointed knife tip or your
fingernail to work loose the outside of the strip where they join
together. If the chocolate is completely set the wrap will almost un-
peel itself. If it has any resistence put it back in the fridge for a few
more minutes.

You can fill the cake top with chocolate curls, ruffles or shavings. Or
you can use fresh or gumpaste flowers. It looks nice to wrap a pretty
ribbon around the middle of the set wrap, attach with a dab of melted
chocolate, make a bow and attach the same way. Refrigerate to set
the chocolate.

A couple of tips I have found from experience. When you attach the wrap, get the bottom of it in as close to the cake as possible before uprighting and wrapping around the cake. After it is attached you can run your fingertip along the top edge to clean off any excess chocolate, but don't press down or in on the plastic, it will make the wrap set wobbly. Also, people have a tendency to want to smooth the wrap with their hands after it is in place on the cake. If you do that the wrap will set wavy, not a nice look. And you want a nice smooth edge on the top, not jagged. So make sure your chocolate is thick enough on the edges of the plastic.

I have never tried making a wrap with candy melts and am not sure how it would work, but you could experiment, let us know if it works for you. When cutting the cake, use a serrated edged knife dipped in hot water and wiped dry with a towel, use a sawing motion to cut. Clean the knife blade after each cut and dip the blade in hot water, wipe and continue cutting.

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You are welcome Sher. I am always happy to see a new decorator starting out, it means the art will continue. I have a granddaughter inlaw and a great niece who are both just starting out and already doing nice work. Good thing because it gives me someone to leave my cake things when I am gone. Neither of my two daughters decorate but are really good cooks and bake wonderful goodies.

Stampinsher said:

I just love your techniques and designs.  Thanks for your acceptance of friends and I'm glad you can see my stuff.  You are sweet with the gentle words about me being a hobbyist when it comes to caking.  I'm always learning from the wonderful people here on our site, thank you!!!

Shirley Wilson said:

I accepted your friends request Sher, maybe that's why I couldn't view your photos. In asking if you were a decorator, I might have worded that differently. I do know some who are bakers are not decorators and others decorate but baking is not their favorite thing. I don't know if I would be considered a professional eirher, and I wasn't born with a piping bag in my hand. I have just learned over the years from some really good instructors and have had help from forums like this where people are willing to share. I think having a love of the art is where we all begin. I remember as a little girl standing outside our local bakery with my nose pressed to the window and wishing I could do cakes like those. Just walking in the door and having that wonderful aroma hit your senses is addictive.


Yep, I think it's in the genes Linda. Your Aunt Helen would be proud of what you have accomplished. But tell us,  did you ever get that coconut cake you wanted so badly? Usually I do a decorated cake for my family members but this year my daughter Melissa and I were talking about a frozen cake I used to buy, Pepperidge Farms coconut cake with lemon curd filling and how much we liked it. I don't see it anywhere in my area anymore. So I made 2 loaf cakes for her birthday, filled with lemon curd and covered in buttercream and fresh coconut. She took them to work with her and said they were delicious.
Linda Wolff said:

Shirley! I remember doing that too! I can remember sitting down on the bottom of the grocery cart that my Mom was pushing and the cake display was right at my eye level and they had this pretty corrugated pink wrap all around the glass case and cakes sitting inside and I was smelling that wonderful aroma! I specifically remember a square white cake all covered in coconut and I knew that I would love it if only Mom would buy it. I also remember getting those tiny little cake mixes that went with an easy bake oven and smelling the egg white mix inside. Every time I open a can of Wilton meringue powder it brings back that memory and that smell. It was always the wedding cakes that I was drawn to at a wedding. Not so much the rest of it. We must have been born to bake or maybe we had an ancestor that was a baker and it's in our DNA. My aunt Helen used to make wedding cakes, but I grew up in Ohio and she was in Iowa and I had no idea that she was a baker.

Shirley Wilson said:

I accepted your friends request Sher, maybe that's why I couldn't view your photos. In asking if you were a decorator, I might have worded that differently. I do know some who are bakers are not decorators and others decorate but baking is not their favorite thing. I don't know if I would be considered a professional eirher, and I wasn't born with a piping bag in my hand. I have just learned over the years from some really good instructors and have had help from forums like this where people are willing to share. I think having a love of the art is where we all begin. I remember as a little girl standing outside our local bakery with my nose pressed to the window and wishing I could do cakes like those. Just walking in the door and having that wonderful aroma hit your senses is addictive.

Yes!! And I was right, Shirley, it was wonderful! I think of the three of us, my sister and brother and me, I am the only one who likes coconut. But I have never been able to find a good scratch cake that has ever tasted as good as those white coconut covered cakes in the bakery. And, I hardly ever see a coconut cake out for sale anymore either. Your loaves covered in coconut look so yummy! Your daughter is one lucky girl to have a Mom who shares the same tastes. My daughter watches every tiny bit of food that goes into her mouth so that she can keep her teeny tiny size (unlike her mother) so she doesn't share the same interests as I do when it comes to yummy stuff. Isn't it funny how our childhood memories formed who we are? You were blessed enough to have a Mom that was a great baker and liked to be in the kitchen...and my Mom hated cooking and baking, but since she grew up with five sisters who had to do most of that growing up, she was more than willing to let my sister, brother, and me do whatever we wanted in the kitchen, just as long as we cleaned up the mess. It kind of took the pressure off of her to have to cook. Since my sister was five years older than me, she had almost all of the kinks worked out with how things worked in the kitchen and pretty much let my brother and me be her helpers. Although, sometimes she could be mean enough to take tastes of cookie dough or cake batter and not let us have any! There was one time when I was about 11 when I had learned to make a pretty darn good pie crust and so I thought I would make a great dessert for the family by making a pie that day, so I went out and picked a huge amount of mulberries and put them in my pie shell (no sugar, no butter and no cornstarch or flour , mind you) and once it was done, I took it out of the oven and tipped it just a little bit and all of the juice ran all over the kitchen floor. The crust was perfect tasting -on top-and was a soggy sticky mess on the bottom. The pie was tasteless and awful. Lesson learned...mulberries are for the birds. lol

Shirley Wilson said:


Yep, I think it's in the genes Linda. Your Aunt Helen would be proud of what you have accomplished. But tell us,  did you ever get that coconut cake you wanted so badly? Usually I do a decorated cake for my family members but this year my daughter Melissa and I were talking about a frozen cake I used to buy, Pepperidge Farms coconut cake with lemon curd filling and how much we liked it. I don't see it anywhere in my area anymore. So I made 2 loaf cakes for her birthday, filled with lemon curd and covered in buttercream and fresh coconut. She took them to work with her and said they were delicious.
Linda Wolff said:

Shirley! I remember doing that too! I can remember sitting down on the bottom of the grocery cart that my Mom was pushing and the cake display was right at my eye level and they had this pretty corrugated pink wrap all around the glass case and cakes sitting inside and I was smelling that wonderful aroma! I specifically remember a square white cake all covered in coconut and I knew that I would love it if only Mom would buy it. I also remember getting those tiny little cake mixes that went with an easy bake oven and smelling the egg white mix inside. Every time I open a can of Wilton meringue powder it brings back that memory and that smell. It was always the wedding cakes that I was drawn to at a wedding. Not so much the rest of it. We must have been born to bake or maybe we had an ancestor that was a baker and it's in our DNA. My aunt Helen used to make wedding cakes, but I grew up in Ohio and she was in Iowa and I had no idea that she was a baker.

Shirley Wilson said:

I accepted your friends request Sher, maybe that's why I couldn't view your photos. In asking if you were a decorator, I might have worded that differently. I do know some who are bakers are not decorators and others decorate but baking is not their favorite thing. I don't know if I would be considered a professional eirher, and I wasn't born with a piping bag in my hand. I have just learned over the years from some really good instructors and have had help from forums like this where people are willing to share. I think having a love of the art is where we all begin. I remember as a little girl standing outside our local bakery with my nose pressed to the window and wishing I could do cakes like those. Just walking in the door and having that wonderful aroma hit your senses is addictive.

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